Top 3 Surefire Scientific Tips to Ask for a Raise

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

klklkkkjjklkkk for a salary increase is not the most comfortable conversation to have at work. In fact, a study by Harvard scholars showed that the most dreaded of all work conversations is asking the boss for a pay raise. This is even more challenging for women compared to their male colleagues.

 

The best way to hack such a conversation is by going into the manager's room well prepared. Here are some scientifically proven methods that will get you that pay rise you have always wanted.

 

1. Avoid Afternoons

Have you heard about the morning morality effect? This effect suggests that people are more moral during the morning hours, meaning they could be more considerate of specific requests. As the day progresses, the same people may be more inclined to make less ethical decisions. Morning is, therefore, one of the best times to ask for a raise.


 But don't forget to set a meeting with your boss. It is best to ask a raise in private. Avoid discussing raise in workplace common areas. If you are not in the same place as your boss, you can set a video meeting. But don't ask for a raise in an email.



 

2. Friday over Monday

According to an article in Forbes, Mondays are known to produce a negative tense environment in the office. The first day back from a vacation, are not generally a good time to ask for a raise. 


Try to set up a meeting in mid-week or the last days of the week, such as Friday. This will work perfectly, especially if your senior is looking forward to a fantastic weekend.  

3. Timing is Everything

Sometimes it is not a matter of which day to ask, but a general 'when' in line with how long you have been at the company or the type of work you do. Ted Leonhardt, a negotiation expert, suggests that you wait at least a year in the company before you ask for a pay rise. Many company managers already expect that you will make a request at such a time, so getting a listening ear will be easier.

 

Also, if you have increased responsibilities, you are better placed to ask for a pay raise. New responsibilities often mean an expansion of your skillset, and sometimes even your working hours will be affected.

 

There are times when you get better offers from other companies, meaning that your skillset is in high demand. At such times, you can ask your current employer for a raise so that you may consider remaining at the company instead of taking the other job with higher pay.

 

Conclusion

Although asking for a raise could be intimidating, the results are often worth it. Payscale noted that at least 75% of people who ask for a raise, get it with 44% getting the amount they wanted. Once you get that raise, you will be glad you took the

 By Shahla Aliyeva

 

Asking for a salary increase is not the most comfortable conversation to have at work. In fact, a study by Harvard scholars showed that the most dreaded of all work conversations is asking the boss for a pay raise. This is even more challenging for women compared to their male colleagues.

 

The best way to hack such a conversation is by going into the manager's room well prepared. Here are some scientifically proven methods that will get you that pay rise you have always wanted.

 

1. Avoid Afternoons

Have you heard about the morning morality effect? This effect suggests that people are more moral during the morning hours, meaning they could be more considerate of specific requests. As the day progresses, the same people may be more inclined to make less ethical decisions. Morning is, therefore, one of the best times to ask for a raise.


 But don't forget to set a meeting with your boss. It is best to ask a raise in private. Avoid discussing raise in workplace common areas. If you are not in the same place as your boss, you can set a video meeting. But don't ask for a raise in an email.

 

2. Friday over Monday

According to an article in Forbes, Mondays are known to produce a negative tense environment in the office. The first day back from a vacation, are not generally a good time to ask for a raise. 


Try to set up a meeting in mid-week or the last days of the week, such as Friday. This will work perfectly, especially if your senior is looking forward to a fantastic weekend.  

 

3. Timing is Everything

Sometimes it is not a matter of which day to ask, but a general 'when' in line with how long you have been at the company or the type of work you do. Ted Leonhardt, a negotiation expert, suggests that you wait at least a year in the company before you ask for a pay rise. Many company managers already expect that you will make a request at such a time, so getting a listening ear will be easier.

 

Also, if you have increased responsibilities, you are better placed to ask for a pay raise. New responsibilities often mean an expansion of your skillset, and sometimes even your working hours will be affected.

 

There are times when you get better offers from other companies, meaning that your skillset is in high demand. At such times, you can ask your current employer for a raise so that you may consider remaining at the company instead of taking the other job with higher pay.

 

Conclusion

Although asking for a raise could be intimidating, the results are often worth it. Payscale noted that at least 75% of people who ask for a raise, get it with 44% getting the amount they wanted. Once you get that raise, you will be glad you took the chance.